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israel and gaza, and, yet, more rocket fire tonight. hillary clinton calls it a critical moment for the region. everyone wants to know the same thing. will it last? we have top officials from both sides "outfront" tonight. and speaker of the house john boehner put obama care on the table. he says if we're serious about getting our financial house in order, obama care has to go. is he crazy? or crazy like a fox? let's go "outfront." good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. and "outfront" tonight, cease-fire. 142 people were killed in gaz why and five in israel, egypt helped negotiate a temporary truce which took effect at 9:00 at night in tel aviv. it was met with gunfire in the streets of gaza city. it is fragile. israeli defense forces say there are five rockets launched from gaza since the cease-fire went into effect. and prime minister benjamin netanyahu's statement was cautious. he said he was willing to give the egyptian cease-fire a chance before there is a need to use greater force. not exactly a ringing endorsement. here's the key thing, while the united states got invo
, including israel and gaza on the brink of war. >> we're going to have to see what kind of progress we can make in the next 24-36-48 hours. if we're serious about wantsing to resolve this situation and a create a genuine peace process it starts with no more missiles being fired into israel's territory. >> first off, we're in a developing story in the middle east. let's go now to stephanie gosk, who is in tel aviv with the latest. what's the tone on ground today? >> well you hear the president say that as long as rockets were dropping, it was going to be impossible to get a cease-fire here. and the rockets definitely keep on coming. and there have been attacks back and forth. a couple of volleys of rockets that came toward tel aviv. intercepted by the israeli missile defense system, iron dome, which end up intercepting all four rockets before they hit. southern israel was not quite so lucky. there were five people injured there when a house was targeted by one of the rockets. today the deadliest day for gaza, more than 20 have been killed. the deadliest attack over the course of the day was
but the united states, israel and others are not celebrating. we will get the details ahead. the senate is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure would "reaffirm the right of the palestinian people to self determination and to independence in their
's expected to pass overwhelmingly this afternoon poenl the united states and israel will be voting no. great britain is planning to abstain. nbc's martin fletcher join me, after covering celebrations that began early in ramallah. quite a lot of celebrating among the palestinians. we should stress this is symbolic. martin it will give them access, potentially to the international criminal court of justice, action against israel they've long been wanting to take. doesn't move them toward statehood. the u.s. says this is a step back, not a step forward. from the palestinian perspective, this is long awaited. and achieves a lot of what they've been trying to do on the world stage. >> reporter: what it does, it's a step forward for them, it's a major step forward. but the people i was speaking to in ramallah, palestinians say it's not a big deal. it's not going to change anything on the ground. nevertheless it is a major step forward and something the palestinian leader president has been trying to do for a year he was beaten, if you like, almost into not taking this step last year by the united
this morning. it's changing by the minute out of israel. this morning israeli tv reporting three israelis were killed in rocket strikes in the southern part of the country. this comes as the israeli military has launched an aggressive new campaign to cripple hamas after repeated rocket attacks. as many as 750 this year, they say, launched from gaza into southern israel. last night president obama spoke on the phone with prime minister benjamin netanyahu acknowledging israel's right to defend itself but also urging him to not have civilian casualties. this youtube video showing an air strike yesterday killing the top military commander of hamas. it was part of a widespread campaign against targets that the israeli military says it will broaden in the coming days. this morning defense forces dropped leaflets over gaza warning residents to stay away from hamas operatives. on twitter, a clear message from israeli defense forces. quote, we recommend that no hamas operatives, whether low level or senior leaders, show their faces above ground in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night w
waving because of an impending decision at the united nations. i'll ask israel's ambassador to the united states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound du
-- perhaps israel -- would face. they've already tested their missiles to show what a retaliatory strike on tel aviv would be. these drills also have the intended consequence of raising the price a little bit. the iranians are saying, okay, it's going to cost more if you bomb us, therefore, if we come to the negotiating table, we want more. and this all has to be looked at in the prism, if you will, of u.s./israel relations after the elections here. the prime minister here in israel, prime minister netanyahu, and president obama have a very icy relationship. the prime minister all but endorsed governor romney in the past election, and there's been a lot of fear here that now a second term president obama will take a much tougher line against israel when it comes to iran, when it comes to the palestinians. there has been some vocal, hostile, very negative reaction here by israeli politicians to president obama's re-election, and there's a lot of anger at the prime minister for making israel and the united states' support of israel a partisan issue, a political issue during the presidentia
two 2 1/2 hours the u.n. set to recognize palestine as a state. while israel and the united states oppose the vote the palestinians are expected to receive overwhelming support in the general assembly. in europe several countries, including france, spain, denmark, have announced they will vote to approve palestine ace nonmember state. and in a blow to u.s. and israeli opposition, germany said this morning it will abstain rather than voting no. america's closest ally the united kingdom is expected to abstain. palestinians are also receiving support from israel's former prime minister, who hold "the daily beast," quote i believe the palestinian request from the u.n. is congruent with the basic concept of the two state solution. i see no reason to oppose it. once the united nations will lay the foundations for the idea we and israel have to encourage a serious -- engage in a serious process of negotiations. hillary clinton disagrees. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n., outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because, n
.s. says it won't help its bid to establish a palestinian stateside by side with israel. >> we oppose palestinian efforts to upgrade their status at the u.n. outside of the framework of negotiations to achieve a two-state solution because no matter what happens at the united nations, it will not produce the outcome that this government -- this president and certainly i strongly support. >> nbc's martin fletcher is live for us in tel aviv. martin, it's nothing new that israel ends up losing p.r. battles with the united nations. this is sort of what's happened over the years. this was a vote that was actually delayed almost a year -- the united states successfully delayed this vote for a long time. what's going to happen today? >> reporter: well, the united states tried to delay this vote, too, very strongly and also israel. what's going to happen today is they're going to lose. it's going to be a bit of a slap in the face for the united states after having tried to persuade the palestinian leader not to take this vote. the palestinians it seems will have an overwhelming support in the
the cease-fire in israel and hamas is a disaster with massive protests. the growing crisis in the largest population-wise in the region, egypt, and what it means for the mill east. >> health experts say there is a new report that shows too much exercise could be killing people. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] woer what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relf ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. gives you a low $18.50 monthly plan premium... and select generic hypertension drugs available for only a penny... so you can focus on what really matters. call humana at 1-800-808-4003. he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axir
between israel and hamas is holding up. then he brokered the agreement crabbing startling new power -- powers and plans of the same time he is not another dictator. we're joined. and the other timid consequences of obamacare. half the states taking a pass in the president's plan for exchanges. is obamacare an even bigger bundle them we thought? we take a look in tonight's "chalk talk" the next. and waiting in line. i don't have to leave my desk and get up and go to the post office anymore. [ male annncer ] with stamps.com, you can print real u.s. postage for all your letters and packages. it gives you the exact amount of postage you need the instant you need i can you print on stamps? no. first class. priority mail. certified. international. and the mailman picks it up. i don't leave the shop anymore. [ male announcer ] get a 4-week trial plus $100 in extras including postage and a digital scale. go to stamps.com/tv and never go to the post office again. ♪ lou: now we have learned there are 16 states that refuse to set up so-called insurance exchanges. sixteen of them. obamacare c
: but the united states and israel fiercely fought the shift. >> this is a provocative, unhealthy step that could undermine the peace process. >> it's a huge set back for the prospects of restarting peace talks with israel. >> shepard: tonight, what this means for the entire mideast. plus, two winning tickets for the record-setting power ball jackpot. >> the power ball jackpot winner in arizona will split the prize with the other winner in missouri. >> shepard: so who are those mystery winners? and executives at the twinkies manufacturer got big pay hikes last year even as the company was fighting to stay afloat. now with hostess brands heading down the tubes and how sands out of work. some of those execs are coming back for more. but first from fox this thursday night, this was the moment when history unfolded at the united nations. >> the voting has been completed. [cheers] >> shepard: with that the general assembly officially changed the palestinian status to a nonmember observer state much like the vatican. the final vote today a landslide 138 to 9. with everybody else abstaining. the united
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
thanksgiving record of 2,703,000,000 back in 2009. up next, a cease-fire agreement between israel and hamas is holding up. then he brokered the agreement crabbing startling new power -- powers and plans of the same time he is not another dictator. we're joined. and the other timid consequences of obamacare. half the states taking a pass in the president's plan for exchanges. is obamacare an even bigger bundle them we thought? we take a look in tonight's "chalk talk" the next. ♪ lou: now we have learned there are 16 states that refuse to set up so-called insurance exchanges. sixteen of them. obamacare calls for the creation of virtual marketplace i where consumers can shop for health coverage. this 16 outright refusal to mostly from states with republican governors to be another six states have chosen to go into a partnership with the federal government. seventeen states in the district of columbia are going along and implementing exchanges themselves. there are 11 states, 16, 11 -- we will put them out there as undecided, but nine of these we should point out, nne of these have republican
to witness the vote. the united states, israel and other western countries oppose this move by the palestines. palestinians. more than a dozen european countries are supporting this rez lug. the uk says it may vote yes pending a couple of conditions. the u.s. has supported a two-state resolution for palestinians and israelis. why do american officials oppose u.n. recognition? >> for the most part it won't give the palestinians what they want, which is an actual state. this vote is largely symbolic. it would have no effect on the palestinian sovereignty or borders or any of the things they're looking for. israel is vehemently opposed to this vote. it said it threatened to cut off aid to the palestinians, impose new checkpoints if they do so. what the u.s. is fearing here is that if this vote goes ahead, and we see that it's pretty much a guarantee that it will -- that the palestinians will be upgraded at the u.n., basically it's not going to lead to anything good on the ground. what the u.s. is afraid of is that it will lead to more violence if the palestinians don't see their state actually r
important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credited with getting israel and gaza to end fighting. let's bring in the "time" bureau chief and got the interview and joins us from tel aviv. thank you for joining us and why is morsi the most important man in the middle east? >> well, for a couple of reasons. i mean, one he is just sort of central to, you know, the sort of what they call a new sunni axis of influence. sort of powerful country is counterweight to iran emerging, you know, thinking of qatar in the gulf and turkey, certainly. egypt is just always been. it's the largest most populace county and the sort of anchor. if you're the president of egypt, you should be the most important person in the middle east and the circumstances also favoring morsi and the other reason is because he holds the sort of future of egypt in his hands right now and another revolution with what he does in the coming couple of months. >> carl, i thought it was interesting you spoke with him about his relationship with president obama. and he seems to think it's a good one. >> yeah. t
and israel opposed the resolution. palestine, as an individual state, still does not exist. we are joined from washington. good morning. >> morning. >> this vote did not grant palestinians statehood. it was important to the u.s. and israel, they are both withdrawaling aid to the west bank. 138 countries in total backed the palestinians in this. what does this status grant them? >> well, the vote is really a global endorsement of the palestinian position, a palestinian state. it certainly bolsters abbas and the palestinian authority who were weakened. it gives the palestinians hope and a bit of dignity after so many decades of occupation that a state is possible. let's listen to president abass after the vote yesterday. >> translator: we did not come here seeking to delegitimize a state established years ago. that is israel. rather, we came to aform the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve independence, that is palestine. >> as you said, christine, it doesn't give the palestinians anything tangible. the u.s. feels this is a false sense of accomplishment. on the ground, things are go
with israel, and the united states. and anybody else belonging to the u.n. just for some context here, though, the plo has been a permanent observer. that's been their status since 1974. and that has given palestinians the right to speak out and be heard at the assembly. but it doesn't give them a right to vote. richard roth, who covers the u.n. extensively and is our cnn favorite on this topic, is there to really give a little more context as to what they wanted to and what kind of status it would give them and how far up in status it would actually elevate them. richard, tell us what it means. >> okay. first, just to clarify, hamas not really here with the palestinians. the palestinian president abbas is in new york, met with the secretary general last night. yes, this is, as usual with the u.n., words matter. sometimes one letter in a document could be a time bomb. what we have here is the u.n. upgrading later today the status of the palestinians here. they are in effect going to become sort of a state within a group of states. but really, as you mentioned, they won't have the right to vot
the status to punish israel. >> two states, one jewish and one arab. >> the jewish territory created israel. but for three palestinians palestinians rejected that. today they took a step shy of statehood. they are granted wider participation in the u.n. system and does not create a country. >> we will not give up or tire. the determination will not wane. we'll continue to achieve peace. above all, i felt the people would not relink tish the national rights. >> the vote went against the wishes of the obama administration. the israel and u.s. voted no saying two-state achievement can only be achieveed through the direct negotiations. >> today unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstams to pass to peace. that's why the united states voted against it. >> last year, mahmoud abbas sought statehood through the security council. israeli officials brand it as a public relations act without any real meaning. >> why continue to make painful sacrifices for peace in exchange for pieces of paper that the other side will not honor. >> it will make it less likely. >> jerusalem, as t
, on the constitution and the attack on the judges right after he brokered the deal between israel and hamas. so he was already rending services in the international community and then asking for a license at home. it's really basically a page from the book of hosni mubarak. i think in washington, there is great uncertainty, what to do with the islamists in power. this is not just from this crisis of november 2b 22nd, this crisis of the last week behind us. this has been the case since the fall of the dictatorship of hosni mubarak, what to do with the islamists in egypt, what to do with the islamists in tunisia and what to do with the rise of the islamists in the region as a whole. >> over the weekend, senator john mccain said, our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy. if you add up all the economic and military assistance the u.s. gives egypt every year, it's about $1.5 billion. should that be used as leverage to try to get egypt back on this democracy road? >> well, i usually have great deference to the opinions of senator mccain. i see things on national security th
cause of death is listed as a stroke. many palestinians believe he was poisoned by israel. that something israel denies. the bottom line here in life he was controversial and in death, bill, he also remains very controversial. bill: what is this pallonium poison? >> it is a radioactive element that can be extremely, extremely deadly. according to u.s. regulatory, nuclear regulatory commission it emits radiation that can essentially destroy human tissue. it can not we are told penetrate skin. if ingested it can cause deadly harm to dna, to main body organs and as well as we are told the immune system. and this particular isotope is so powerful, bill, that we're told that an amount as small as the size of a grain of salt can be deadly. another thing to keep in mind is that it decays very, very quickly. it has a very short half-life. in other words, officials say, after 2 1/2 years it might be very hard to detect. that means after arafat has been buried since 2004, whatever results are reached might in fact be inconclusive. bill? bill: david lee miller, a good mystery you hav
israel. the general assembly of the united nations is almost certain to grant the palestinians a status upgrade. this is a step that palestinians hope will eventually lead to recognition as an independent state. take a look at the crowd that's gathered there. this is yasser arafat square in ramallah. ♪ their president mahmoud abbas live. the vote is scheduled to be happening two and a half hours from now. this is something that israel and the u.s. have spent months lobbying against. i want to bring in jim clancy to put this in perspective here from cnn international. jim, first of all, what does this mean in very plain terms, for the palestinians if they get this upgraded status at the u.n., the significance? >> somebody calls them a state. they are allowed to join international organizations. they're even allowed to join the international criminal court. now, this is what worries israel and the united states because in doing so, they could file complaints with the court about the occupation, how palestinians are being treated. right now they have no such recourse. this is what could
by -- met by some tough language from the security council. not from the government, israel or anyone. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that expe
that would boost their status on the world stage. the united states and israel have lobbied hard against the move warning it could backfire and actually set back palestinian hopes for full statehood and negotiated peace. but with some key european nations on board, palestinians view the vote as a game changer. cnn's frederik pleitgen reports from the west bank city of ramallah. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york, palestinian president mahmoud abass addressing supporters. the final decision is to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observers state in the united states and the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assemb assembly, the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican. its territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to rectify a grave historical unjustice that the palestinians had undergone beginning with the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> reporte
and is expected to pass. >> keep in mind the united states and israel are both opposed to the resolution. let's go to cnn foreign affairs reporter live in washington. good morning. >> good morning, brooke. israel very opposed to the move. the u.s. knows this move went give the palestinians what they want -- a state. this is largely symbolic. will have no effect on sovereignty or borders. hillary clinton met with president abbas and tried to assure him not to go ahead with the move. let's listen to what she told reporters yesterday. sfm know matter what happens it will not change what i support. the only way to get a lasting solution is to commence direct negotiations and we need an environment conducive to that. we have urged both parties to refrain from actions that might in any way make a return to meaningful negotiations -- >> now, brooke, president abbas promised to return to negotiations after the vote. but with israel so opposed to the move it doesn't seem likely. prime minister benjamin netanyahu slammed the resolution calling it one-sided saying it doesn't take into account israel's securi
in the u.n. human rights council which has been very anti-israel. and her defense is, look, we do it because it would have been even worse if america hadn't been there to defend israel as this israel bashing went on. >> part of the problem with that statement is that it's indefensible. she made that statement two weeks after the human rights council finished a session in which it passed more israel-bashing resolutions than it had at any session before. so if her presence is doing any good -- or our presence is doing any good, it's not perceptible. megyn: what about syria? we've lost our focus on it in the recent weeks and months with the election, but they are involved in a civil war now, and it was said that bashar assad was about to go. well, he hasn't gone, and, you know, thousands upon thousands of children are dying in syria, many being tortured in front of tear families, and the -- in front of their families, and the unite isn't doing that much. we tried to do something at the united nations, it failed. >> it failed in large measure because the chinese and russians -- with w
. israel bombarded the gaza strip with more than 180 airstrikes today. the king of jordan has canceled a visit to britain under the protest there. "the new york times" reporting the pentagon says it could take more than 45,000 troops to contain them. i cannot remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day. so much is new, and they are all inter-connected. hamas is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our
're hearing shaseveral people have been killed in these attacks. militants have a new warning after israel takes out a top hamas commander. gregg: new questions for the attorney general. what he knew about the investigation into former cia director david petraeus. and was he right to keep word of the affair from the president? we'll ask former attorney general alberto gonzales. martha: the white house, the scene of a big meeting on the so-called fiscal cliff tomorrow. what both sides are saying about taxes, the deficit, and the chances that we could reach a real deal. >> i do think that the spirit of cooperation that you've seen over the last week from myself and my team, from democrats across the aisle. from the president. have created an atmosphere where i think that, i'm, remain optimistic. gregg: welcome back. hard to believe. thanks give something just around the corner. dozens of us airways flight attendants though are picketing at phoenix's sky harbor airport demanding more money and a new contract. without a deal, they warn they may go on strike. the flight attendants have been wor
riding on this. palestinians not only believe he was poisoned there's only one culprit, israel. if he was appointed and it was by israel, of course, who knows what the ramifications of that would be on the street. yeah, they want to make sure that the investigation is done as fairly and as objectively as possible. so what happened is they took 20 specimens from his bones today. those 20 specimens were divided into three, and each set of investigators from russia, france and switzerland took their 20 samples. they'll be doing separate investigations, and then they correlate the results to the end and we'll see whether they will agree or whether there's any dispute. there's a lot riding on this, of course. >> martin fletcher live in tel aviv. thank you. >>> new allegations involving former elmo puppeteer kevin clash. it tops our look at stories around the "news nation" today. a third lawsuit accuses clash of having sex with an underage boy. the latest accuser said he began a relationship with clash back in 2000. he was 16 years old at the time. a spokes woman for clash says, quote, mr.
israel launched an operation against militants in benghazi, killing hamas's military chief. as for the economy, the retail sales fell in october, first decline in three months. that's it from cnbc, first in business worldwide. now back to "hardball." >>> do you think photo i.d. would have made any difference? the outcome of this election? >> yes, i think so. we're looking at all sorts of different precincts and all sorts of same-day registrations. people will go on, we don't have fraud and abuse in our election, but why couldn't we have voter i.d. when majority of our people in wisconsin want it, the governor signed it. why should one judge be able to hold it up? >> there you have the problem with the republican party. pay a lot of attention to that what that woman just said, senate senator. that's the state -- state senator wisconsin, i don't know her, served as mitt romney's co-chair in the state and now she's saying suppressing the voter i.d. cards would have made the difference in wisconsin. let's look at the facts. apparently she's not interested in the fact. obama won
syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we're not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile. but we do think it is it's a broad-based representative group. one of the questions we're going to continue to express is making sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements insinuate themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have to be on gourd about, particularly when wi
, which is important for israel and important for that region. there is a huge amount of work to be done because both president obama and mitt romney had basically said and have carved out the position that president assad must go. but they are doing nothing, certainly not u.s. administration has done nothing to make sure that that happens. and so that could leave the u.s. a little bit exposed to charges of weakness. and today his closest pal if you like, british prime minister david cameron, who was the first to congratulate president obama, said that he really wants to talk to, quote, barack, to figure out how to solve the syrian crisis. >> a lot to come. thanks, christiane. president obama might have won re-election last night but he lost the white house by 20 points. we're going to talk about the changing face of america. what it means for the future of both parties. >> it doesn't matter whether you're black or white or hispanic or asian or native american or young or old or rich or poor, abled, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in america if you are willing to try. [ m
capabilities to go up to 20%. israel and u.s. will build the case for military action, low level violence will continue against iran in various forms. and identify ran -- iran, can prepare an attack on the reactors considering potential success of the operation against the facility in syria. and this will all remove iran's constraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are either -- really concerned with the situation. let me add people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so there are two things which must change. diplomacy and the inspections. first diplomacy. five plus one has served the purpose of the it united front. five plus one mean to me united nations security council related global responsibility, europeans like to prefer three plus three which means the european union is the major player. i'm nervous about that, if you are europe you had better say three plus three otherwise you will not be served your dinner. five plus one, of course, it is important to keep on. i think u.s. should not do what it has done, hide inside this group. u.s. has now tried to ta
that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings that are going to be taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we are not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is to make sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements put themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have t
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